Friday, November 26, 2010

I Wanna Come Back As The Hitch

In response to a question from a Globe and Mail interview about whether there is anything positive in the rituals and ceremonies of religion:

If some people, nonetheless do find it comforting or consoling, I say I wish them joy with it. I just don’t want to have to hear about it. In other words, I don’t want at Christmas time, to know anything the government says or does, such as displays of Christmas trees or indeed, Santa Claus, or nativity scenes, or anything of this sort. ... I don’t want them teaching it in school. I don’t want them asking for government subsidies for it. I don’t want them saying it’s illegal to ridicule it... I’d prefer not to have to know what these people think. Isn’t it enough for them that they have a God who loves them and will give them salvation? I mean, if I believed that, I’d be happy. They’re not happy. They won’t be happy until everyone else believes it too. And that’s surely a very bad sign and it’s a sign of intellectual and moral weakness.

Despite his struggle with cancer, Mr. Hitchens is debating former British Prime Minister Tony Blair this evening on the question of whether religion is a force for good in the world.

6 comments:

payingattention said...

Hear, hear!

wunelle said...

I know, right?

dbackdad said...

Too bad that clarity and logic can't be given to all in their current (and only) lifetime. The world would be quite a bit saner.

shrimplate said...

I know he has personal failings. Don't we all? But having said that, Hitchens is one smart guy and he has a canny way with words.

As a nurse I just happen to sort of "specialize" in esophageal cancer, among a couple other things. I think I have an understanding of what Mr. Hitchens is going through, and all I would wish is that I could help him in some way. It's a tough row to hoe.

wunelle said...

By his own admission he'll be among the very lucky 5% if he's still here in five years. I can't really call it a waste when he's been so prolific and so influential for what would only a couple decades ago be considered a long life. But I'll grief his passing; I just never tire of hearing him speak. He's magnetic for his brilliance and eloquence.

wunelle said...

--er-- "grieve."